Livingstonville Ridgetop Farm

Livingstonville, NY, Schoharie County

For Lease
Updated Mar 3, 2023

Acres Available

100

Open Tillable Acres

30

Wooded (or other) Acres

70

Infrastructure

  • Black outline of a fence Fencing
  • Black outline of a water drop Water access
  • black outline barn icon Barns - Equipment Storage
  • black outline house icon Farmer housing
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Crops Permitted

  • black outline of a carrot Vegetables
  • black outline apple icon Fruits
  • black outline of a wheat germ Grains
  • black outline hay icon Hay
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Livestock Permitted

  • black outline cow icon Cattle - Beef
  • black outline horse icon Equine
  • Black outline of a sheep Goats/Sheep
  • Black outline of a chicken Poultry
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Condition & Current Use

The property is roughly 100 acres on a mountain ridge. It has not been used for agricultural purposes in over 5 years. Most of the open land is flat or has a gentle slope. The 30 acres of open land is split in roughly five areas by trees and the remaining 70 acres of wooded land. Thus there are plots that can be available if someone only needs a portion of the 30 acres. 16 acres of wood area is flat. The remaining 45 or so acres of wooded area has a moderate slope down. The wooded acreage is likely not of use to most farmers, but could be of use to those interested in milling wood to build structures. The wood area does have walnut trees, apple trees (though uncared for currently), evergreens (if you wanted to make essential oils), and other wild items for foraging (e.g. asparagus, mushrooms). The open areas available for farming are currently not being used. Prior uses include some crops, hay, and livestock (e.g. sheep/goat/cows). 

Soil Types

Wellsboro stony silt loam

Farm History & Past Use

prior uses included sheep, hay, horses, cows, pigs, chickens, timber

Tenure Options

Tenure Options

For Lease

A short-term farm lease is desired with very flexible pricing depending on your farming plans and intentions. This includes size of acreage intended for use, method of land use, whether you plan to reside on the property during your farming season, and extent of positive or negative impact to land by your use. For example, goats that also help keep underbrush to a minimum would be more a positive than horses or even cows that can damage the land and grass. As another example, leasing the land for hay also would have a minimal impact to the land.

A business partnership would be subject to business plan, strategy, and feasibility.

Do you require a farmer who qualifies for agricultural assessment?

No

Production Preferences

Livestock / Crops Description

Previously successfully managed livestock have included cows, horses, donkeys, sheep, pigs, and chickens. 

Crops Permitted

  • black outline of a carrot Vegetables
  • black outline apple icon Fruits
  • black outline of a wheat germ Grains
  • black outline hay icon Hay
  • black outline other crops icon Other Crops

Livestock Permitted

  • black outline cow icon Cattle - Beef
  • black outline horse icon Equine
  • Black outline of a sheep Goats/Sheep
  • Black outline of a chicken Poultry
  • Black outline of a bee Bees

Preferred Farming Method

Conventional

Farm Infrastructure

  • Black outline of a fence Fencing
  • Black outline of a water drop Water access
  • black outline barn icon Barns - Equipment Storage
  • black outline house icon Farmer housing
  • black outline electrical icon Electrical access

Fencing

There is fencing in general around the property and within the property. It is in need of repair in areas or upgrading depending on requirements for type of livestock to be enclosed. 

Water Access

There are small streams that run through the property. A fresh spring well can also be dug in pretty much any area of the property. There are also small natural spring fed pools that resist freezing in the winter.

Barns for Equipment/Storage

There is a large entry barn to the property. It is need of some work but is usable. This barn has electrical access.

Farmer Housing

Housing would need to be built if needed. There are ample sites to situate a tiny home or build something to your liking. There's also a 9'x16' Amish shed purchased just 18 months ago that could be converted to tiny home. Plumbing/Electrical would have to be figured out. The entry barn has electrical access. It is large enough to convert an area to livable space but may be more work than going the pre-fabricated or new construction tiny house route.

As common in this area where roads can be blocked in the winter, there's no USPS mail delivery service. 

Additional Property Information

The area for farming has numerous underground springs that are accessed by wells for human use or feed directly into above ground springs for wildlife use. The use of chemicals which can contaminate the water supply is not allowed.

Is the Property Conserved

No

Current Land Zoning

Agricultural

Is the property located in a NY Agricultural District?

Yes

Can the public be on the property as a part of the farm business?

Negotiable

Additional Information About This Property

This farm may be better suited for someone who resides locally and travels to the farm as needed for their farm work. During the winter, there can be reduced or limited access due to snow. Livestock desired to be kept through the winter requires additional work to ensure adequate feed during the periods where the ground is covered by snow.

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